Skip to main content
All Posts By

Eve C.

AMD RX 7800 XT vs AMD RX 6800 XT & NVIDIA RTX 4070 Comparison

By Gaming
RX 6800 XT vs RX 7800 XT

The highly anticipated 7800 XT has finally been released and we’re eager to share its specs with you! In order to give you a better understanding of its performance, we’ll be comparing it to it’s predecessor, the RX 6800 XT, and its NVIDIA equivalent, the RTX 4070. How will it compare? Follow along in our article and find out if it stacks up against its predecessor and competition!

RX 6800 XT
Specifications and Performance

The RX 6800 XT was launched on October 28th, 2020 with a price tag of $650. It was a strong competitor to NVIDIA’s high-end GPUs, particularity in the mid-range and high-end gaming market and received generally positive reviews. The 6800 XT is known for excellent performance, capable of delivering high frame rates at 1440p and 4K resolutions, as well as significant ray tracing performance improvement over AMD’s previous generation. This makes it an excellent option for those who want to experience smooth, high-quality graphics and lightning-fast performance while gaming on their computers. There’s a reason why the RX 6800 XT is known to provide the bang for your buck!

Clock Speeds

Base Clock: 1825 MHz

Game Clock: 2015 MHz

Boost Clock: 2250 MHz

Memory Clock: 2000 MHz

Memory

Memory Size: 16 GB

Memory Type: GDDR6

Memory Bus: 256 bit

Bandwidth: 512.0 GB/s

Board Design

Slot Width: Dual-slot

Dimensions: 10.5in L x 4.7in W x 2in H

TDP: 300 W

Suggested PSU: 700 W

Outputs: 1x HDMI 2.1, 2x DisplayPort 1.4a, & 1x USB Type-C

Power Connectors: 2x 8-pin

Specifications and Perfomance

The RX 7800 XT is one of AMD’s two newest graphics cards on the market. Released on August 6th, 2023 with a starting price of $500, this GPU is a great option for those looking for a high-performance graphics card without breaking the bank. According to AMD, this 1440p GPU is capable of delivering over 60 FPS in the latest games, with the highest settings enabled. However, it may struggle with ray tracing-heavy games, and reaching triple FPS digits may be challenging. To summarize, the RX 7800 XT is a powerful mid-range budget graphics card that can handle most modern games on the highest settings. It offers a solid gaming experience without spending a fortune.

Clock Speeds

Base Clock: 1295 MHz

Game Clock: 2124 MHz

Boost Clock: 2430 MHz

Memory Clock: 2425 MHz

Memory

Memory Size: 16 GB

Memory Type: GDDR6

Memory Bus: 256 bit

Bandwidth: 620.8 GB/s

Board Design

Slot Width: Dual-slot

Dimensions: 10.5in L x 4.4in W x 2in H

TDP: 263 W

Suggested PSU: 600 W

Outputs: 1x HDMI 2.1a & 3x DisplayPort 2.1

Power Connectors: 2x 8-pin

RX 7800 XT
RTX 4070
Specifications and Perfomance

The RTX 4070 was released on April 23rd, 2023 with a launch price of $600. Although the pricing of the 40 series as a whole disappointed many, the RTX 4070 stands out as a mid-performance card at a reasonable price, particularly for 1440p gaming. It performs similarly to the 10 GB RTX 3080, with frame rates of about 100fps at 1440p gaming and 60fps at 4k gaming. This card has solid ray tracing abilities at 1440p, but it may struggle to maintain a high frame rate for ray tracing-heavy games at 4k, such as Cyberpunk 2077. In addition, the RTX 4070 boasts NVIDIA’s latest features, including RTX Video Super Resolution, DLSS 3 Frame Generation, and NVIDIA Reflex.

Clock Speeds

Base Clock: 1920 MHz

Boost Clock: 2475 MHz

Memory Clock: 1313 MHz

Memory

Memory Size: 12 GB

Memory Type: GDDR6X

Memory Bus: 192 bit

Bandwidth: 504.2 GB/s

Board Design

Slot Width: Dual-slot

Dimensions: 9.4in L x 4.3in W x 1.6in H

TDP: 200 W

Suggested PSU: 550 W

Outputs: 1x HDMI 2.1 & 3x DisplayPort 1.4a

Power Connectors: 1x 16-pin

Conclusion:

When looking over the specs, you can see that the RX 7800 XT is not that much of an improvement over the RX 6800 XT. While the 7800 XT has a higher boost clock speed and increased memory bandwidth, it has 768 less cores than the RX 6800. The 6800 XT also has a higher base clock speed, although the difference between these two cards is marginal. In terms of performance, both cards are pretty similar. Likewise, the RTX 4070 also performs similarly to the RX 7800 XT. Where the RTX 4070 excels at ray tracing, the RX 7800 XT shines in its rasterization performance.  Therefore, if you’re currently using a GPU from the previous RTX 30 series or RX 6000 series and considering an upgrade, it might be best to skip the RX 7000 generation.

To be notified when we restock the RX 7800 XT (or any of the RX 7000 / RTX 40 series cards) click the button below!

Subscribe to Our Notify List!

The RTX 40 Series Master Guide

By Gaming

The RTX 40 series has now been out for 8 months – oh how time flies! Starting with the first released card, the RTX 4090, we’ve now got a variety of cards to choose from this series. In this article, we’ll be looking at the cards in this series and what specs they have in store.

Nvidia RTX 4090

Real quick, before we get into the RTX 4090, I’d like to share an article we did a few months back on RTX 4090 Ti rumors so if you’re curious, take a look!

The NVIDIA RTX 4090 Ti Rumors and Expected Release Date

The RTX 4090 was launched on September 20th 2022 with a starting price of $1,599. It’s currently the highest performing card on the market, show a large increase of performance compared to the 3090ti. If you’re looking for the best of the best, this card is for you.

Clock Speeds
Base Clock: 2235 MHz
Boost Clock: 2520 MHz
Memory Clock: 1313 MHz, 21 Gbps effective

Memory
Memory Size: 24 GB
Memory Type: GDDR6X
Memory Bus: 384 bit
Bandwidth: 1008 GB/s

Board Design
Slot Width: Triple-slot
Dimensions: 12″ L x 5.4″ W x 2.4″ H
TDP: 450 W
Suggested PSU: 850 W
Outputs: 1x HDMI 2.1, 3x DisplayPort 1.4a
Power Connectors: 1x 16-pin

Render Config
Shading Units: 16384
TMUs: 512
ROPs: 176
SM Count: 128
L1 Cache: 128 KB (per SM)
L2 Cache: 72 MB

Nvidia RTX 4080

The RTX 4080 was also released on September 20, 2022 with a launch price of $1,199. The RTX 4080 performs outstandingly, often coming in a few FPS short of the RX 4090. The gap in performance does widen when Ray Tracing is taken into account. It provides the best value for higher end cards.

Clock Speeds
Base Clock: 2205 MHz
Boost Clock: 2505 MHz
Memory Clock: 1400 MHz, 22.4 Gbps effective

Memory
Memory Size: 164 GB
Memory Type: GDDR6X
Memory Bus: 256 bit
Bandwidth: 716.8 GB/s

Board Design
Slot Width: Triple-slot
Dimensions: 12.2″ L x 5.5″ W x 2.4″ H
TDP: 320 W
Suggested PSU: 700 W
Outputs: 1x HDMI 2.1, 3x DisplayPort 1.4a
Power Connectors: 1x 16-pin

Render Config
Shading Units: 9728
TMUs: 304
ROPs: 112
SM Count: 76
L1 Cache: 128 KB (per SM)
L2 Cache: 64 MB

Nvidia RTX 4070 Ti

Released on January 3rd  2023 with a launch price of $799, the RTX 4070 Ti is probably the best bang for your buck. Its FPS often hit triple digits and never dip below 60FPS.

Clock Speeds
Base Clock: 2310 MHz
Boost Clock: 2610 MHz
Memory Clock: 1313 MHz, 21 Gbps effective

Memory
Memory Size: 12 GB
Memory Type: GDDR6X
Memory Bus: 192 bit
Bandwidth: 504.2 GB/s

Board Design
Slot Width: Dual-slot
Dimensions: 11.2″ L x 4.4″ W x 1.7″ H
TDP: 285 W
Suggested PSU: 600 W
Outputs: 1x HDMI 2.1, 3x DisplayPort 1.4a
Power Connectors: 1x 16-pin

Render Config
Shading Units: 7680
TMUs: 240
ROPs: 80
SM Count: 60
L1 Cache: 128 KB (per SM)
L2 Cache: 78 MB

Nvidia RTX 4070

The RTX 4070 launched on April 12 2023 with a price tag of $599. Advertised as reaching 100+ FPS at 1440p, this card does exactly that. The RTX 4070 does perform on average about 20% less than the RTX 4070 Ti, but it is a solid graphics card for those who don’t need the highest performing card on the market.

Clock Speeds
Base Clock: 1920 MHz
Boost Clock: 2475 MHz
Memory Clock: 1313 MHz, 21 Gbps effective

Memory
Memory Size: 12 GB
Memory Type: GDDR6X
Memory Bus: 192 bit
Bandwidth: 504.2 GB/s

Board Design
Slot Width: Dual-slot
Dimensions: 9.4″ L x 4.3″ W x 1.6″ H
TDP: 200 W
Suggested PSU: 550 W
Outputs: 1x HDMI 2.1, 3x DisplayPort 1.4a
Power Connectors: 1x 16-pin

Render Config
Shading Units: 5888
TMUs: 184
ROPs: 64
SM Count: 46
L1 Cache: 128 KB (per SM)
L2 Cache: 36 MB

Nvidia RTX 4060

The RTX 4060 is not yet released so not all information is known and this information is subject to change in the future. It’s rumored to be set for release in early June with a price tag of $299.

Clock Speeds
Base Clock: 1830 MHz
Boost Clock: 2535 MHz
Memory Clock: 2250 MHz, 18 Gbps effective

Memory
Memory Size: 8 GB
Memory Type: GDDR6X
Memory Bus: 128 bit
Bandwidth: 288 GB/s

Board Design
Slot Width: Dual-slot
Dimensions: Unknown
TDP: 200 W
Suggested PSU: 550 W
Outputs: 1x HDMI 2.1, 3x DisplayPort 1.4a
Power Connectors: 1x 12-pin

Render Config
Shading Units: 3840
TMUs: 120
ROPs: 48
SM Count: 30
L1 Cache: 128 KB (per SM)
L2 Cache: 24 MB

The RTX 40 series boasts a large increase in performance from the 30 series and is perfect for consumers who want top of the line performance. However, these cards, especially the RTX 4090, are not only physically large but consume a lot of power and are pricey. Many people have decided to skip the 40 series generation due to these issues, but there are also a lot of gamers who appreciate what the 40 series has to offer.

#TornadoNation: CEG Interviews CTX Austin Esports Director and Athletes

By Gaming

As a proud sponsor of Concordia University Texas’s esports team, we’re excited to have the chance to interview their director, Marc Valdoria, as well as some of the student athletes about their experiences.

 

Team updates can be viewed on their Twitter and streams can be watched on their Twitch channel.

Interview with Concordia Esports Coordinator/Director Marc Valdoria

Thank you for taking the time to speak with us on your collegiate esports program. How long has your university had a varsity esports program and how long have you been the director of the program?

I have been Concordia’s esports coordinator/director since the program started.Concordia launched the esports program in Fall 2019, and we were the first varsity esports program in Central Texas.

 

Is it fair to say you are also the program’s coach? Or do you have paid coaches at your school too?

That is fair to say that I’m the program’s “head coach.” In the future, as we expand, the goal is to have paid coaches per team. As of now, I can coach/manage some of the teams. However, I rely a lot on our players, who have a lot of knowledge of the game and have exemplified leadership characteristics. It has been working for the past couple of years as it helps me manage my workload by giving our students opportunities to earn experience in a leadership position within their teams.

 

How did you get involved with the esports program? Were you already at the university in a different role when you became the director and helped develop the program?

I got involved with the esports program while working in the marketing department at Concordia. Our Athletic Director looked for help starting the program within our university, and I stepped up to the plate because I love esports and I am extremely passionate about it.

 

Which games do you compete in, about how many athletes do you have per team and how many athletes do you have overall?

We compete in Apex, League of Legends, Valorant, Overwatch 2, Rocket League, Super Smash Ultimate, and Chess. Overall, we have over 40+ student athletes in the program.

 

How’s the season going by the way?

Our Spring season has come to a wrap, and I couldn’t have been more proud of how hard our athletes played this year. We got back from our SCAC Conference Showdown in San Antonio last week where our program took 2nd overall.

 

As director, I’m sure recruiting is a big part of what you do as you have so many different games you compete in. I’m sure our audience would want to know what is involved in recruiting. How do you find your athletes and about how many do you recruit per year?

We find our athletes in various ways, such as social media, online/LAN high school esports tournaments, Discord, Next College Student Athlete (NCSA), and in-person events.

 

Is there a good high school esports ecosystem that you can draw from? Or do the athletes actively reach out to you with their game play portfolio or do you reach out to them?

Some student-athletes reach out to me directly, which is typically a rare case. However, there are some ecosystems that I can think of, such as the Discord servers like High School Esports League (HSEL), eFuse, SPIN Collegiate, etc., which are great because they have a lot of high school students who are looking for collegiate teams. At the same time, there are organizations such as Texas Scholastic Esports Federation (TexSEF) that put on recruiting events, which there is one that is about to happen at the end of the month (April 28-29th) at the Esports Stadium Arlington.

 

Is there anything in particular that you look for in their game play?

When we recruit students, we look at a variety of things, such as their rank and history of the game. However, we also gauge their approach to the game and their attitude. We want players who are motivated to improve, willing to listen, and ready to adapt to the team. If they have those qualities, they have a high potential to be a high-impact player in our program. A player could be a highly skilled/ranked player, but if they have a bad attitude and are toxic, they would not fit in well with our program.

 

Another aspect that I’m sure our audience will be interested to know: Do your athletes receive partial or full scholarships or any other benefits from the university?

We currently have partial scholarships for our program. Our esports student-athletes could qualify for the esports scholarship ($2,000/year). This scholarship can also stack with our other scholarship offerings at Concordia. The additional benefit they have is exclusive access to our esports facility, which only esports players and members can use.

 

What are some of the bigger challenges confronting your esports program today? What about esports in general?

One of the biggest challenges confronting our esports program (and a lot of esports programs across the nation) is that budget is limited. We would love to be able to send teams across the state/country to compete with other collegiate teams, but we simply do not have the budget to do so. At the same time, having a constraint on budget means that upgrades and arena expansion would also be affected, which in turn can affect recruitment down the line.

 

That’s about it for our questions and thank you for your time. Final thoughts: Do you have anything else to add that you would like for our gaming audience to know about your program and or collegiate esports?

Esports is a lot more accessible than people think! Collegiate esports has gained significant popularity, with more colleges and universities offering programs and scholarships for athletes. This is a great opportunity for students who are passionate about gaming to pursue their interests while also earning a degree.

Interview with Rocket League Captain Bradley Wadas

Hi there and thank you for taking the time out of your busy school and esports schedule to talk to us about your collegiate esports experience. What year are you and in which games do you compete?

I am a junior and I play Rocket League.

 

How has the esports athletic experience been so far?

The experience has been great, I like winning and we win a lot so it’s enjoyable.

 

Be honest: How many hours a week do you say you practice and compete?

3-5 hours, mostly solo training because I am weird like that.

 

What are your training methods and how do you get ready for tournaments? Do you study streams of your competition?

I play a few casual or comp games or sit in solo training, whatever I feel like. No I don’t like to review footage because I review the game in my head.

 

When’s the competition season, is it in the spring or fall or both?

For SCAC (“Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference”), spring, but NACE (“National Association of Collegiate Esports“) Starleague is both fall and spring.

 

How are you doing so far this year?

We finished 2nd in SCAC and went to playoffs in NACE.

 

Let’s go back to before you started your collegiate athletic career. When did you first start gaming?

I started gaming when I was as young as I can remember, but I didn’t start playing Rocket League until 2015, when it came out of course.

 

At what point did you realize “hey I can do this in college”?

After playing a few matches with the team during tryouts.

 

What was the recruiting process like at your university? Did the director reach out to you or did you actively approach them?

I saw a flyer in my school email and I decided to give it a shot.

 

Has doing esports changed the way you play games in your free time?

Esports has made me play rocket league more, but that’s about the only change.

 

That’s about it and let’s wrap it up with one final question: Think back to when you were gaming before college and compare that to what you know now after being a college esports athlete. What words of advice or tips would you give high schoolers to help them land a spot on a collegiate esports team?

I would say to just keep playing your game in the highest rank possible so you can get better every game you play, and research + practice just as much time as you play

Interview with Valorant Captain Kevin Early

Hi there and thank you for taking the time out of your busy school and esports schedule to talk to us about your collegiate esports experience. What year are you and in which games do you compete?

I am a Junior at Concordia (TX) and compete in Valorant. The Valorant team is new as it was created and started to compete this semester.

 

How has the esports athletic experience been so far?

The start of the season was unpredictable with a rotating starting lineup. However, it felt great when the team was solidified and we melded together.

 

Be honest: How many hours a week do you say you practice and compete?

Valorant practices twice a week for a total of eight hours. With games, the time committed is about 10 hours a week. On top of this, I play outside of practice and stack competitive queues with my teammates. I usually play Valorant in my free time when I finish everything else I have on my schedule.

 

What are your training methods and how do you get ready for tournaments? Do you study streams of your competition?

I play the tournaments the same as I would during practice. I take it seriously and compete to the best of my abilities. I do not scout the competition; however, a vital aspect of improving video games is VOD reviews. Instead of going over the competition and finding mistakes, I focus on self-improvement.

 

When’s the competition season, is it in the spring or fall or both?

Concordia’s main Valorant competition is an in-person tournament held every spring. There are other tournaments we take part in but competing in SCAC is our main goal as a team.

 

How are you doing so far this year?

I am doing great so far! I started playing Valorant 9 months ago and I am currently ascendant three, just 2 games away from immortal.

 

Let’s go back to before you started your collegiate athletic career. When did you first start gaming?

I first started playing competitive fps after I graduated from middle school. The first game I started playing was Overwatch. I have hit top 500 on support, dps, and tank.

 

At what point did you realize “hey I can do this in college”?

I realized I could play esports in college when I came to Concordia. I found out that the esports college scene was bigger than I imagine. There are multiple schools around the U.S. that offer huge scholarships for esports.

 

What was the recruiting process like at your university? Did the director reach out to you or did you actively approach them?

I did not go through the traditional recruiting process at my university. I was already admitted and found out that Concordia had an esports team when I was on a campus tour. After the tour, I reached out to the program director and was offered a scholarship to play esports.

 

Has doing esports changed the way you play games in your free time?

Esports has changed the way I play games in my free time. Before joining the esports program I used to play video games when I had free time. Now, I have to plan my schedule with dedicated time slots to practice Valorant

That’s about it and let’s wrap it up with one final question: Think back to when you were gaming before college and compare that to what you know now after being a college esports athlete. What words of advice or tips would you give high schoolers to help them land a spot on a collegiate esports team?

My advice to high school students would be not to just mindlessly play video games because that leads to burnout. Play for a few hours with a strong mental with a focus on improvement. Joining a team is also something I would recommend experiencing. Team gameplay is very different from ladder. In team gameplay, it is important to work together. In ladder, it is more about punishing mistakes. VOD reviews are important and vital for improvement.

Interview with League of Legends Captain Nick Reak

Hi there and thank you for taking the time out of your busy school and esports schedule to talk to us about your collegiate esports experience. What year are you and in which games do you compete

My name is Nick Reak, I compete in League of Legends and Valorant and I am a Junior.

 

How has the esports athletic experience been so far?

I have been playing collegiate for about 3 years now, but this was my first semester at a school where we were able to field a full roster for either of the games I play. I would say the experience was fun, but my hope is that there will be more support from schools in the future as it still feels like we are outcasts rather than athletes.

 

Be honest: How many hours a week do you say you practice and compete?

For team practice and competition it is usually about 15-20 hours with both teams combined, and for individual practice I spend another 15-20 hours a week.

 

What are your training methods and how do you get ready for tournaments? Do you study streams of your competition?

Currently, I don’t spend a lot of time VOD reviewing, most of my preparation comes from watching professional play and videos. Otherwise, I study the drafts of our opponents and attempt to learn their general draft identity to know how to counter or nullify it.

 

When’s the competition season, is it in the spring or fall or both?

Mainly spring, though we do practice in fall and work on group dynamics and practice.

 

How are you doing so far this year?

Alright, wish we could have finished higher in the standings, but I am motivated to keep competing. Financially I am struggling because I want to focus on practice and improving and between the long grind hours and school work, actual work becomes hard to fit in.

 

Let’s go back to before you started your collegiate athletic career. When did you first start gaming?

I started gaming when I was about 5-6, it was casually on PlayStation 1, and over the years I started competing in high school back around 2009 in Halo.

 

At what point did you realize “hey I can do this in college”?

I realized I could compete in college and go back to school when the coach from NMU reached out to recruit me in 2020.

 

What was the recruiting process like at your university? Did the director reach out to you or did you actively approach them?

I reached out to Marc our director, I was already at another school in Kentucky at the time, and I really wanted a school that would compete. After talking to Marc I decided on CTX.

 

Has doing esports changed the way you play games in your free time?

Not really, I am hyper competitive and all it has done is reinforce the drive to compete and win.

 

That’s about it and let’s wrap it up with one final question: Think back to when you were gaming before college and compare that to what you know now after being a college esports athlete. What words of advice or tips would you give high schoolers to help them land a spot on a collegiate esports team?

Start playing team sports, you need to be able to play with others. I was already someone who had a traditional sports background, but the number of players that stunt the competitive nature of a program due to not knowing how to be teammates is massive. So learn to play with teams, and learn to be a active member who strives to improve with those around them.

Mean & Green Esports: CEG Sits Down and Talks with UNT’s Esports Director and Athletes

By Gaming

Cutting Edge Gamer is proud to announce that we are sponsoring UNT esports. Go Mean Green! To kick off our sponsorship, we’ve interviewed Dylan, the UNT esports coach, along with some of the players about their experience in college esports.

You can keep up to date with the team via their Twitter and view their streams on the UNTEsports Twitch channel.

Interview with UNT Athletic Director, Dylan Wray

Thank you for taking the time to speak with us on your collegiate esports program. How long has your university had a varsity esports program and how long have you been the director of the program?

UNT esports has had a varsity program for 5 years. Just about as long as I’ve been working there!

 

Is it fair to say you are also the program’s coach? Or do you have paid coaches at your school too?

I typically explain my role as an athletic director and that is often the easiest way sum it up given the scope of what we have going on our campus with our competitive side as well as our broadcast and marking side of our operations. UNT has three paid coaches that oversee our competitive teams.

 

How did you get involved with the esports program? Were you already at the university in a different role when you became the director and helped develop the program?

A bit of luck, a vision, and an odd collection of skill sets allowed me to walk into this world when UNT posted a job opening to design and then implement a competitive esport program. I had just moved from Colorado after grad school following my now spouse after she got a job down in DFW and was looking for opportunities when this dream job showed up on my radar. Been here ever since.

Which games do you compete in?

UNT esports competes in Rocket League, Overwatch, League of Legends, and soon Women’s Valorant!

 

How’s the season going by the way?

It’s been going swell! Our Rocket League team has qualified for CRL for 5 years in a row, and while we didn’t make playoffs we have been participating in quite a few leagues this spring to keep us busy. Our League team qualified for playoffs for two years in a row. Most of our teams are now in the trial phase as we scout out new students coming to UNT to prep for Fall 2023. Our marketing team has launched a new twitch podcast called the CHØ Show that goes over the weekly matches, replays, and gets a community leader at UNT to talk about what they do in the campus gaming community!

 

As director, I’m sure recruiting is a big part of what you do as you have so many different games you compete in. I’m sure our audience would want to know what is involved in recruiting. How do you find your athletes and about how many do you recruit per year?

Oh gosh that is the question isn’t it? Our recruits come from a wide verity of sources. Some students are just go getters and email or directly message me on Discord. Others we find from social media like twitter LFT’s (“Looking for Teams”) or Instagram. What’s been really interesting is several recruitment platforms that operate similar to traditional athletics that bring top recruit players to us! I generally have 5-10 openings per year depending on if students are graduating or not.

 

Is there a good high school esports ecosystem that you can draw from? Or do the athletes actively reach out to you with their game play portfolio or do you reach out to them?

Texas esports has grown significantly over the years, it’s been awesome to see various orgs and schools pop up and do cool things in the space. I’d say it’s a mix of us finding students we want to reach out too and students and coaches/recruiters reaching out to us.

 

Is there anything in particular that you look for in their game play?

Our coaches look for several primary factors including mechanics, team communication, and your ability to handle pressure. I look at your GPA, your socials, and how you handle yourself professionally in an interview. It’s one thing to be good at the game, but it’s another thing to be a representative for our institution and what it stands for.

 

Another aspect that I’m sure our audience will be interested to know: Do your athletes receive partial or full scholarships or any other benefits from the university?

Our students receive partial scholarships but keep whatever they win from events and tournaments as a scholarship payout.

 

What are some of the bigger challenges confronting your esports program today? What about esports in general?

It’s a double-edged sword, but the space is developing rapidly and the benchmark for what cut it for a supported program keeps getting pushed by very talented and dedicated people in this industry. It means it keeps folks like me on their toes to make sure I’m still competitive and provide the right amount of support for my students. At the end of the day though, so long as we’re providing opportunities for students to compete and push themselves to learn we’re on the right track.

I also think there’s still a bit of growing pains that separate us from traditional sports. There’s still a fair number of teams that are managed by club programs and that forces developer’s hand in making league structures that don’t often benefit established programs. Advanced scheduling is a rallying cry phrase I’ve heard often in my time with other directors, that’s very needed in this space.

 

That’s about it for our questions and thank you for your time. Final thoughts: Do you have anything else to add that you would like to add?

We really appreciate the support Cutting Edge Gamer has provided UNT Esports and the students in the program! #GMG!

Interview with League of Legends Captain, Sammy (PuertoJew)

Hi there and thank you for taking the time out of your busy school and Esports schedule to talk to us about your collegiate esports experience. What year are you and in which games do you compete?

I am a senior and I compete in league of legends

 

How has the esports athletic experience been so far?

The esports experience is over for me and I can say I had a good time playing competitive esports and found new friends, however would say I am not happy with the results.

 

Be honest: How many hours a week do you say you practice and compete?

When I was still competing I would have team practice 9 hours a week then a match at the end of the week, Solo practice is hard to gauge but I would usually play around 4-6 games of solo q (“solo queue”) every weekday and watch most pro matches so if I had to be honest I would say I would spend roughly 10-12 hours a day looking and refining my league of legends skills and knowledge while I was playing.

 

What are your training methods and how do you get ready for tournaments? Do you study streams of your competition?

My training methods are play a lot of soloq of every champ I think my team will want me to play, when it comes to game days I always listen to a few specific songs to get me into a good mood for the games, and before the games I go in a custom game and don’t leave till I farm 50 cs in a row without missing one. Then the other aspect of my training is watching pro-matches and pro-players to see what they do and what new things they are coming up with through pro builds and stuff like that.

 

When’s the competition season, is it in the spring or fall or both?

The competition season is truly year round for league of legends there is always amateur stuff to play in, however for CLOL in fall there is a pre-season tournament called the fall warm-up and in the spring is where the season takes place from around February-March till you are knocked out.

 

How are you doing so far this year?

The team this year had great growth, we had a top laner who improved tremendously and a mid laner swap to support and learn the role, we had many ups and downs but I am happy with how we grew through the year.

 

Let’s go back to before you started your collegiate athletic career. When did you first start gaming?

I first started gaming from as far back as I can remember, i was told by my parents back when I lived in Puerto Rico I would play on my uncle Nintendo 64 I think, I’m not sure which one it was I must’ve been like 1 or 2.

 

At what point did you realize “hey I can do this in college”?

I realized I could do this in college when I found out they had a team, I had no idea college esports was really an option at UNT.

 

What was the recruiting process like at your university? Did the director reach out to you or did you actively approach them?

The recruiting process for me was I googled UNT esports league of legends and found a reddit post, and I cant remember her name but I asked a mod on the subreddit if I could get a tryout and she said to fill out the form she sent me and I would hear back in march. I then tried out and made the team.

 

Has doing esports changed the way you play games in your free time?

Playing esports only changed how I play league of legends, it made me better at the game and I learned a lot to improve myself in the game. However I still play other games and it never impacted how I played those.

 

That’s about it and let’s wrap it up with one final question: Think back to when you were gaming before college and compare that to what you know now after being a college esports athlete. What words of advice or tips would you give high schoolers to help them land a spot on a collegiate esports team?

I think that every aspiring collegiate esport athlete should have an open mind to learn more about the game and not assume they are the best nor do they know everything. This can apply to life as well but it helps a lot when trying to make it onto a team and to understand why teammates do what they do in game, instead of getting angry with them.

Interview with Rocket League Player, Darryn Salinas

Hi there and thank you for taking the time out of your busy school and esports schedule  to talk to us about your collegiate esports experience. What year are you and in which games do you compete?

Junior and Rocket League

 

How has the esports athletic experience been so far?

Love it. Being able to compete with good friends is so much fun

 

Be honest: How many hours a week do you say you practice and compete?

We have 4 hours of scheduled practice but we also play randomly throughout the week. Competing varies but the weeks that we have tournaments can have days that last multiple hours.

 

What are your training methods and how do you get ready for tournaments? Do you study streams of your competition?

Training involves playing the game on your own and with your team to stay consistent in the game. Tournament preparation is mostly studying our own gameplay rather than our opponent’s gameplay.

 

When’s the competition season, is it in the spring or fall or both?

We compete in both fall and spring.

 

How are you doing so far this year?

Pretty well, we’ve dropped out early in some tournaments but overall we have improved a lot.

 

Let’s go back to before you started your collegiate athletic career. When did you first start gaming?

My dad put me on Halo 1 when I was 2 and I’ve been playing games ever since.

 

At what point did you realize “hey I can do this in college”?

My freshman year of college I found the untrl discord server and the more I played the game the more I realized that I can do this as in school.

 

What was the recruiting process like at your university? Did the director reach out to you or did you actively approach them?

I tried out through the discord server and then met everyone.

 

Has doing esports changed the way you play games in your free time?

Yes, it can sometimes be less fun when you’re playing for improvement instead of for fun but its still really enjoyable.

 

That’s about it and let’s wrap it up with one final question: Think back to when you were gaming before college and compare that to what you know now after being a college esports athlete. What words of advice or tips would you give high schoolers to help them land a spot on a collegiate esports team?

Enjoy the grind or else it becomes a chore and don’t have an ego.

 Is Xbox Game Pass Worth it for PC Only Players?

By Gaming

With the abundance of new games constantly releasing, it can be overwhelming. How will I afford all the games I want to play? What if I regret buying a game? Or maybe you’re looking for a way to test out games before fully committing to paying full price. If you can relate to any of these scenarios, then Xbox’s game pass may be the subscription service for you.

While you may hear ‘Xbox’ and think this doesn’t apply to you, a PC only gamer, you’re in luck! Xbox offers two subscription services for PC players, giving them access to over 400 games to play with more games being added all the time. The two subscriptions we will be going over into this article are the Xbox Game Pass Ultimate subscription and the PC Game Pass subscription. We’ll be answering the hard hitting questions such as “what are these services?” and “how does this service benefit me, a PC gamer?”

PC Game Pass

$9.99/month

  • Unlimited access to over 100 high-quality games on PC
  • New games added all the time
  • Xbox Game Studios titles the day they release
  • Member discounts and deals
  • Includes EA Play

Game Pass Ultimate

$14.99/month

  • Unlimited access to over 100 high-quality games across PC, console, and mobile devices
  • New games added all the time
  • Xbox Game Studios titles the day they release
  • Member discounts and deals
  • Free Perks including in-game content and partner offers
  • Play games on your mobile phone and tablet from the cloud
  • Includes Xbox Live Gold and EA Play
The Game Pass Service

Game Pass is a service started in June 2017 that allowed subscribers access to hundreds of games on the Xbox. Since then, two more tiers for the subscription have been created, the PC Game Pass and the Game Ultimate Pass, which gives PC users unlimited access to this catalog for as long as they have a subscription. Gamers playing on a Macbook, tablet, or smartphone can also access and stream the entire game library through the cloud, so this service can be enjoyed by just about everyone everywhere.

Starting at $10/month for PC Game Pass or $15/month for Game Pass Ultimate, these subscriptions gives you unlimited access to a growing catalogue of over 450 games. These games include popular titles like Minecraft, the Yakuza series, and much more along with tons of indie games and instant access to newly released AAA titles. The game library is constantly being updated, with games rotating in and out of service. Don’t worry though – if a game you’re playing through the service is leaving your save data won’t be deleted and you are able pick up where you left off after buying the game. Members of the service also receive up to a 20% discount on titles that are leaving the rotation as well as up to 10% off related game add-ons, so you can buy your favorite games at a discount.

Members also receive other perks with the service! Microsoft offers the first month of membership for $1 – perfect for those who want to try out the membership without committing – and the benefits just keep coming from there. Members receive discounts and deals on games, perks including in-game content, partner offers, EA Play, and Xbox Live Gold.

EA Play

EA Play provides members with unlimited access to a collection of their most popular titles such as the Sims, Battlefield, Mass Effect, and more. Members receive a 10% discount on all purchases of Electronic Arts digital content, which extends to season passes, points packs, and DLC. Members also get the ability to test out select newly released games for up to 10 hours.

Xbox Live Gold

If you opt for the more expensive option of Game Pass Ultimate, you’ll get Xbox Live Gold included with your subscription. This add-on is important if you want to play online multiplayer games or if you want to play on a Mac or portable device through the cloud.  This add-on also lets you save up to 50% when purchasing games and gives members 2 free games a month.

Pros & Cons

Pros

  • The first month of service is only $1
  • Large library of games to choose ones and new titles being added all the time
  • Affordable and depending on what titles you play, cheaper than outright buying games
  • Has a lot of game options for older PC build
  • Game data is saved even if a title is taken out of rotation
  • Good for people who play shorter games, game a ton, or like trying new games

Cons

  • Fewer titles than PS Plus
  • Games do not come with DLC
  • Cloud gaming streaming is limited to 1080p at 60 FPS
  • Titles rotate out of service
  • Not the best for people who don’t spend much time gaming or spend a lot of time on one game
Is it Worth it?

While the value of this service differs from person to person, I think we can safely say that Xbox’s PC Game Pass is more than worth it. At only $10/month, you can download and play an unlimited number of games from their library, get access to special offers, discounts, and services, and get instant access to Xbox Studio titles the day they release. If you want a bang for your buck or just want to try some new games for a month, the PC pass or Game Pass Ultimate is the way to go!

The Evolution of the NVIDIA GeForce XX70 Series Graphics Cards

By Gaming
Before we begin

Today we’ll be looking into the NVIDIA GeForce xx70 line of graphics cards to see how much they’ve upgraded and improved through the years, as well as the transition from GTX to RTX and the introduction of ray tracing.

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070

Graphics Processor
GPU Name: GP104
GPU Variant: GP104-200-A1
Architecture: Pascal
Foundry: TSMC
Process Size: 16 nm
Transistors: 7,200 million
Die Size: 314 mm²

Graphics Card
Release Date: Jun 10th, 2016
Generation: GeForce 10
Predecessor: GeForce 900
Successor: GeForce 20
Production: End-of-life
Launch Price: $379 USD
Bus Interface: PCIe 3.0 x16

Clock Speeds
Base Clock: 1506 MHz
Boost Clock: 1683 MHz
Memory Clock: 2002 MHz, 8 Gbps effective

Memory
Memory Size: 8 GB
Memory Type: GDDR5
Memory Bus: 256 bit
Bandwidth: 256.3 GB/s

Board Design
Slot Width: Dual-slot
Length: 267 mm, 10.5 inches
Width: 112 mm, 4.4 inches
Height: 40 mm, 1.6 inches
TDP: 150 W
Suggested PSU: 450 W
Outputs: 1x DVI, 1x HDMI 2.0, 3x DisplayPort 1.4a
Power Connectors: 1x 8-pin
Board Number: PG411 SKU 20

Graphics Features
DirectX: 12 (12_1)
OpenGL: 4.6
OpenCL: 3.0
Vulkan: 1.3
CUDA: 6.1
Shader Model: 6.4

Render Config
Shading Units: 1920
TMUs: 120
ROPs: 64
SM Count: 15
L1 Cache: 48 KB (per SM)
L2 Cache: 2 MB

Theoretical Performance
Pixel Rate: 107.7 GPixel/s
Texture Rate: 202.0 GTexel/s
FP16 (half) performance: 101.0 GFLOPS (1:64)
FP32 (float) performance: 6.463 TFLOPS
FP64 (double) performance: 202.0 GFLOPS (1:32)

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070

The 20 series is where we see the introduction to RTX. NVIDIA’s transition from GTX to RTX was a huge stepping stone for more realistic graphics as real-time tracing was able to simulate individual rays of light. RTX graphics cards also established Tensor cores which are used to accelerate deep learning which allows users to upscale their resolution without a significant loss of performance.

Graphics Processor
GPU Name: TU106
GPU Variant: TU106-400A-A1
Architecture: Turing
Foundry: TSMC
Process Size: 12 nm
Transistors: 10,800 million
Die Size: 445 mm²

Graphics Card
Release Date: Oct 17th, 2018
Generation: GeForce 20
Predecessor: GeForce 10
Successor: GeForce 30
Production: Active
Launch Price: $499 USD
Bus Interface: PCIe 3.0 x16

Clock Speeds
Base Clock: 1410 MHz
Boost Clock: 1620 MHz
Memory Clock: 1750 MHz, 14 Gbps effective

Memory
Memory Size: 8 GB
Memory Type: GDDR6
Memory Bus: 256 bit
Bandwidth: 448.0 GB/s

Board Design
Slot Width: Dual-slot
Length: 229 mm, 9 inches
Width: 113 mm, 4.4 inches
Height: 35 mm, 1.4 inches
TDP: 175 W
Suggested PSU: 450 W
Outputs: 1x DVI, 1x HDMI 2.0, 2x DisplayPort 1.4a, 1x USB Type-C
Power Connectors: 1x 8-pin
Board Number: PG160 SKU 52

Graphics Features
DirectX: 12 Ultimate (12_2)
OpenGL: 4.6
OpenCL: 3.0
Vulkan: 1.3
CUDA: 7.5
Shader Model: 6.6

Render Config
Shading Units: 2304
TMUs: 144
ROPs: 64
SM Count: 36
Tensor Cores: 288
RT Cores: 36
L1 Cache: 64 KB (per SM)
L2 Cache: 4 MB

Theoretical Performance
Pixel Rate: 103.7 GPixel/s
Texture Rate: 233.3 GTexel/s
FP16 (half) performance: 14.93 TFLOPS (2:1)
FP32 (float) performance: 7.465 TFLOPS
FP64 (double) performance: 233.3 GFLOPS (1:32)

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070

Graphics Processor
GPU Name: GA104
GPU Variant: GA104-300-A1
Architecture: Ampere
Foundry: Samsung
Process Size: 8 nm
Transistors: 17,400 million
Die Size: 392 mm²

Graphics Card
Release Date: Sep 1st, 2020
Availability: Oct 29th, 2020
Generation: GeForce 30
Predecessor: GeForce 20
Successor: GeForce 40
Production: Active
Launch Price: $499 USD
Bus Interface: PCIe 4.0 x16

Clock Speeds
Base Clock: 1500 MHz
Boost Clock: 1725 MHz
Memory Clock: 1750 MHz, 14 Gbps effective

Memory
Memory Size: 8 GB
Memory Type: GDDR6
Memory Bus: 256 bit
Bandwidth: 448.0 GB/s

Board Design
Slot Width: Dual-slot
Length: 242 mm, 9.5 inches
Width: 112 mm, 4.4 inches
TDP: 220 W
Suggested PSU: 550 W
Outputs: 1x HDMI 2.1, 3x DisplayPort 1.4a
Power Connectors: 1x 12-pin
Board Number: PG142 SKU 10

Graphics Features
DirectX: 12 Ultimate (12_2)
OpenGL: 4.6
OpenCL: 3.0
Vulkan: 1.3
CUDA: 8.6
Shader Model: 6.6

Render Config
Shading Units: 5888
TMUs: 184
ROPs: 96
SM Count: 46
Tensor Cores: 184
RT Cores: 46
L1 Cache: 128 KB (per SM)
L2 Cache: 4 MB

Theoretical Performance
Pixel Rate: 165.6 GPixel/s
Texture Rate: 317.4 GTexel/s
FP16 (half) performance: 20.31 TFLOPS (1:1)
FP32 (float) performance: 20.31 TFLOPS
FP64 (double) performance: 317.4 GFLOPS (1:64)

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4070

Graphics Processor
GPU Name: AD104
GPU Variant: AD104
Architecture: Ada Lovelace
Foundry: TSMC
Process Size: 4 nm
Transistors: 35,800 million
Die Size: 295 mm²

Graphics Card
Release Date: 2022
Availability: 2022
Generation: GeForce 40
Predecessor: GeForce 30
Production: Unreleased
Bus Interface: PCIe 4.0 x16

Clock Speeds
Base Clock: 2310 MHz
Boost Clock: 2610 MHz
Memory Clock: 1325 MHz, 21.2 Gbps effective

Memory
Memory Size: 12 GB
Memory Type: GDDR6X
Memory Bus: 192 bit
Bandwidth: 508.8 GB/s

Board Design
Slot Width: Dual-slot
Length: 336 mm, 13.2 inches
Width: 140 mm, 5.5 inches
Height: 61 mm, 2.4 inches
TDP: 285 W
Suggested PSU: 600 W
Outputs: 1x HDMI 2.1, 3x DisplayPort 1.4a
Power Connectors: 1x 12-pin
Board Number: PG141 SKU 331

Graphics Features
DirectX: 12 Ultimate (12_2)
OpenGL: 4.6
OpenCL: 3.0
Vulkan: 1.3
CUDA: 8.9
Shader Model: 6.6
Render Config
Shading Units: 7680
TMUs: 240
ROPs: 80
SM Count: 60
Tensor Cores: 240
RT Cores: 60
L1 Cache: 128 KB (per SM)
L2 Cache: 48 MB

Theoretical Performance
Pixel Rate: 208.8 GPixel/s
Texture Rate: 626.4 GTexel/s
FP16 (half) performance: 40.09 TFLOPS (1:1)
FP32 (float) performance: 40.09 TFLOPS
FP64 (double) performance: 626.4 GFLOPS (1:64)

To conclude...

The xx70 series of graphics cards have improved quite a bit since their first iteration. They are a good value GPU, providing quality gaming at a reasonable price. If you’re looking for a card that gives you a bang for your buck, the xx70 cards are a good starting point.

Nvidia 3000 Series VS AMD RX 6000 Series

By Gaming

With the Nvidia 4000 series set to release later this year, gamers are anxiously waiting to see what the next-gen GPUs have to offer. Before we start upgrading our PCs though, let’s take a step back and look at what the current generation graphics cards have to offer.

NVIDIA RTX 3090 vs AMD RX 6900 XT

RTX 3090

Clock Speeds

Base Clock 1395 MHz
Boost Clock 1695 MHz
Memory Clock 1219 MHz

Render Config

Shading Units 10496
TMUs 328
ROPs 112
SM Count 82
Tensor Cores 328
RT Cores 82
L1 Cache 128 KB (per SM)
L2 Cache 6 MB

Memory

Memory Size 24 GB
Memory Type GDDR6X
Memory Bus 384 bit
Bandwidth 936.2 GB/s

Graphics

DirectX 12 Ultimate
OpenGL 4.6
OpenCL 3.0
Vulkan 1.3
CUDA 8.6
Shader Model 6.6

RX 6900 XT

Clock Speeds

Base Clock 1825 MHz
Game Clock 2015 MHz
Boost Clock 2250 MHz
Memory Clock 2000 MHz

Render Config

Shading Units 5120
TMUs 320
ROPs 128
Compute Units 80
RT Cores 80
L0 Cache 32 KB per WGP
L1 Cache 138 KB per Array
L2 Cache 4 MB
L3 Cache 128 MB

Memory

Memory Size 16 GB
Memory Type GDDR6
Memory Bus 256 bit
Bandwidth 512.0 GB/s

Graphics

DirectX 12 Ultimate
OpenGL 4.6
OpenCL 2.1
Vulkan 1.3
Shader Model 6.5

While both graphics cards boast high performance, it’s no surprise that the RTX 3090 comes out on top – it’s why the majority of gamers prefer Nvidia over AMD. Compared to the RX 6900, the RTX 3090 has better memory, made faster with its wider memory bus. The RTX 3090 excels when it comes to ray tracing but shows similar performance to the RX 6900 when ray tracing isn’t used. And though the RX 6900 has less than half the stream processors as the RTX 3090 has CUDA cores, the RX 6900 doesn’t necessarily work half as fast. Given all the specs, the RX 6900 is more equivalent to the RTX 3080.

NVIDIA RTX 3080 vs AMD RX 6800 XT

RTX 3080

Clock Speeds

Base Clock 1440 MHz
Boost Clock 1710 MHz
Memory Clock 1188 MHz

Render Config

Shading Units 8704
TMUs 272
ROPs 96
SM Count 68
Tensor Cores 272
RT Cores 68
L1 Cache 128 KB (per SM)
L2 Cache 5 MB

Memory

Memory Size 10 GB
Memory Type GDDR6X
Memory Bus 320 bit
Bandwidth 760.3 GB/s

Graphics

DirectX 12 Ultimate
OpenGL 4.6
OpenCL 3.0
Vulkan 1.3
CUDA 8.6
Shader Model 6.6

RX 6800 XT

Clock Speeds

Base Clock 1700 MHz
Game Clock 18 MHz
Boost Clock 2105 MHz
Memory Clock 2000 MHz

Render Config

Shading Units 3840
TMUs 240
ROPs 96
Compute Units 60
RT Cores 60
L0 Cache 32 KB per WGP
L1 Cache 128 KB per Array
L2 Cache 4 MB
L3 Cache 128 MB

Memory

Memory Size 16 GB
Memory Type GDDR6
Memory Bus 256 bit
Bandwidth 512.0 GB/s

Graphics

DirectX 12 Ultimate
OpenGL 4.6
OpenCL 2.1
Vulkan 1.3
Shader Model 6.6

Unlike the RTX 3090 and RX 6900, the RTX 3080 and RX 6800 are more evenly matched. Despite the RX 6800’s greater memory, the RTX 3080’s upgraded GDDR6X plus its wider memory width gives it a greater standard memory bandwidth. The RX 6800 however, uses 10% less memory and generally there’s very little FPS difference between them. Like all Nvidia cards, the RTX 3080 does better with ray tracing, but both cards show similar performance when ray tracing isn’t in use.

NVIDIA RTX 3070 vs AMD RX 6700 XT

RTX 3070

Clock Speeds

Base Clock 1500 MHz
Boost Clock 1725 MHz
Memory Clock 1750 MHz

Render Config

Shading Units 5888
TMUs 184
ROPs 96
SM Count 46
Tensor Cores 184
RT Cores 46
L1 Cache 128 KB (per SM)
L2 Cache 4 MB

Memory

Memory Size 8 GB
Memory Type GDDR6
Memory Bus 256 bit
Bandwidth 448.0 GB/s

Graphics

DirectX 12 Ultimate
OpenGL 4.6
OpenCL 3.0
Vulkan 1.3
CUDA 8.6
Shader Model 6.6

RX 6700 XT

Clock Speeds

Base Clock 2321 MHz
Game Clock 2424 MHz
Boost Clock 2581 MHz
Memory Clock 2000 MHz

Render Config

Shading Units 2560
TMUs 160
ROPs 64
Compute Units 40
RT Cores 40
L0 Cache 32 KB per WGP
L1 Cache 128 KB per Array
L2 Cache 3 MB
L3 Cache 96 MB

Memory

Memory Size 12 GB
Memory Type GDDR6
Memory Bus 192 bit
Bandwidth 384.0 GB/s

Graphics

DirectX 12 Ultimate
OpenGL 4.6
OpenCL 2.1
Vulkan 1.3
Shader Model 6.5

On average, the RTX 3070 is about 20% faster than the RX 6700. Both are tied at 1080p gaming but the RTX 3070 begins to pick up performance, boasting a 3% lead on 1440p gaming and 10% on 4k gaming. Although the RX 6700 is good for 1440p gaming, it can’t handle ray tracing at 1440p, making the RTX 3070 a clear winner between the two.

NVIDIA RTX 3060 vs AMD RX 6600 XT

RTX 3060

Clock Speeds

Base Clock 1320 MHz
Boost Clock 1777 MHz
Memory Clock 1875 MHz

Render Config

Shading Units 3584
TMUs 112
ROPs 48
SM Count 28
Tensor Cores 112
RT Cores 28
L1 Cache 128 KB (per SM)
L2 Cache 3 MB

Memory

Memory Size 12 GB
Memory Type GDDR6
Memory Bus 192 bit
Bandwidth 360.0 GB/s

Graphics

DirectX 12 Ultimate
OpenGL 4.6
OpenCL 3.0
Vulkan 1.3
CUDA 8.6
Shader Model 6.6

RX 6600 XT

Clock Speeds

Base Clock 1626 MHz
Game Clock 2044 MHz
Boost Clock 2491 MHz
Memory Clock 1750 MHz

Render Config

Shading Units 1792
TMUs 112
ROPs 64
Compute Units 28
RT Cores 28
L0 Cache 32 KB per WGP
L1 Cache 128 KB per Array
L2 Cache 2 MB
L3 Cache 32 MB

Memory

Memory Size 8 GB
Memory Type GDDR6
Memory Bus 128 bit
Bandwidth 224.0 GB/s

Graphics

DirectX 12 Ultimate
OpenGL 4.6
OpenCL 2.1
Vulkan 1.3
Shader Model 6.5

The RTX 3060 and RX 6600 are very close in performance – the RX 6600 being about 3% faster in 1080p gaming and the RTX being 2% faster at 1440p gaming. The RTX 3060 offers a 50% larger frame buffer which will allow it to handle future games and textures better, making it the better option of the two for prolonged use.

NVIDIA RTX 3050 vs AMD RX 6050 XT

RTX 3050

Clock Speeds

Base Clock 1552 MHz
Boost Clock 1777 MHz
Memory Clock 1750 MHz

Render Config

Shading Units 2560
TMUs 80
ROPs 32
SM Count 20
Tensor Cores 80
RT Cores 20
L1 Cache 128 KB (per SM)
L2 Cache 2 MB

Memory

Memory Size 8 GB
Memory Type GDDR6
Memory Bus 128 bit
Bandwidth 224.0 GB/s

Graphics

DirectX 12 Ultimate
OpenGL 4.6
OpenCL 3.0
Vulkan 1.3
CUDA 8.6
Shader Model 6.6

RX 6050 XT

Clock Speeds

Base Clock 2310 MHz
Game Clock 2610 MHz
Boost Clock 2815 MHz
Memory Clock 2248 MHz

Render Config

Shading Units 1024
TMUs 64
ROPs 32
Compute Units 16
RT Cores 16
L0 Cache 32 KB per WGP
L1 Cache 128 KB per Array
L2 Cache 1024 MB
L3 Cache 16 MB

Memory

Memory Size 4 GB
Memory Type GDDR6
Memory Bus 64 bit
Bandwidth 143.9 GB/s

Graphics

DirectX 12 Ultimate
OpenGL 4.6
OpenCL 2.2
Vulkan 1.3
Shader Model 6.6


Looking at the specs alone, I’m sure it’s no surprise when I say that the RTX 3050 crushes the RX 6500 when it comes to 1080p gaming. The RX 6500 was originally created for laptops and rather than proving it matches the RTX 3050, it struggles to prove it belongs on the GPU market. And while it does technically have ray tracing, good luck getting any games to run smoothly with it. If you’re looking for the cheapest GPU for 1080p gaming, your best bet is the RTX 3050.

How VR is Changing Gaming

By Gaming

Conceptualized in the late 1800s, the idea of Virtual Reality has been the subject of human interest for a long time. VR started as just 360-degree murals and the creation of the stereoscope, which gave users a sense of depth and perception when looking at images – but has now evolved into an wholly interactive experience. What was once an idea to make images more immersive has developed into making entire worlds immersive, thanks to the introduction of VR to gaming. And while Virtual Reality has been making some huge strides in many areas in recent years, VR is quickly changing the gaming scene. 

Immersive Gameplay

One of the things that draws players to VR gaming is just how immersive gameplay is. Whereas in a regular game the player is a spectator to the main character, interacting with objects and your environment through them and their perspective, in VR the player is the main character. Everything they see is from their point of view, and they are able to directly interact with everything in the game. Players have a 360 view of the world and are free to roam around the perimeters as well as interact with objects and characters in a more meaningful way. Players feel more involved in gameplay because they must move their head to view their surroundings and move their hands to interact with objects – sometimes they even need to move their whole body depending on the gameplay. VR emulates the feeling of physically being inside the game.

Changing Gameplay

VR is not only changing the way players interact with video games, but also changing how games can be played as well. VR allows players to enjoy common gaming mechanics in a new way. Gaming mechanics such as fishing and driving, which require the use of your eyes and hands, completely transform when they’re translated into VR. Game genres such as rhythm games that only required a mouse and a keyboard now require you to physically hit and dodge notes in VR.

Video game design is also changing thanks to the VR boom. Non-VR game environments are molded to fit the character the gamer is playing. The game is programmed to make the character feel like it belongs in that world. The in-game camera only shows the angles that work best with the character and the character is programmed to respond to its conditions. VR games, on the other hand, must be programmed to account for the player’s presence in the environment. Games have to be more thorough with haptic feedback in order to make players feel like they’re actually using their hands and that the objects in the game have a physical presence. Objects in VR need to feel similar to how they do in real life to fully immerse the player in the game world.

VR System Requirements

Each VR headset has their own requirements to make it run. Here are the minimum requirements for two of the most popular VR headsets, the VIVE and Oculus Rift:

VIVE Minimum System Requirements

Processor GPU Memory Video Output USB port Operating System
Intel Core i5-4590/AMD FX 8350 or better NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970/AMD Radeon R9 290 or better 4 GB RAM or more DisplayPort 1.2 or newer 1x USB 3.0 Windows 7, Windows 8.1 or later, Windows 10

Oculus Rift Minimum System Requirements

Processor GPU Memory Video Output USB port Operating System
Intel i3-6100/AMD Ryzen 3 1200, FX4350 or better NVIDIA GTX 1050 Ti/AMD Radeon RX 470 or better 8 GB RAM or more Compatible Mini DisplayPort video output 1 x USB 3.0 port Windows 10

Virtual reality has a lot of appeal I mean, who wouldn’t want to completely experience and explore new environments? Or re-experience their favorite games in a new and different way? VR opens many new doors, especially in gaming and we’re excited to see how VR continues to progress and change the way we game – especially with the introduction of the Metaverse.

The Evolution of the XX80 Ti Graphics Cards

By Gaming

Released in 1999, The Geforce 256 is marketed as “the world’s first GPU. Since then, graphics cards have come a long way. In this article, we will be focusing on the XX80 Ti series and how each installment has upgraded.

GTX 980 Ti

The GTX 980 Ti was the second most powerful graphics card from that generations’ Nvidia cards and was the fastest card in 2015. Providing excellent 4k performance and VR Ready certification, it’s no wonder why that was.

GPU Engine Specs

Base Clock (MHz) 1000 MHz
Boost Clock (MHz) 1075 MHz

Memory Specs:

Memory Clock 7.0 Gbps
Standard Memory Config 6 GB
Memory Interface GDDR5
Memory Interface Width 384-bit
NVIDIA CUDA Cores 2816

GTX 1080 Ti

The GTX 1080 Ti is a huge upgrade from the GTX 980 Ti with about a 70% performance increase. And with only a $50 price difference from its predecessor on release, the 1080 Ti is a solid upgrade. While it does offer one memory controller less, the GDDR5X memory is faster which leads to a comparable memory bandwidth.

GPU Engine Specs

Base Clock (MHz) 1481 MHz
Boost Clock (MHz) 1582 MHz

Memory Specs:

Memory Clock 11 Gbps 
Standard Memory Config 11 GB
Memory Interface GDDR5X
Memory Interface Width 352-bit
NVIDIA CUDA Cores 3584

RTX 2080 Ti

Although the RTX 2080 Ti costs about 70% more than the GTX 1080 Ti, it’s not easy to justify the price difference. While the 1080 Ti does have several upgrades, the performance of the GPU is slightly underwhelming for an upgrade. The RTX 2080 does, however, have features such as Deep Learning Super Sampling (DLSS) and Real-Time Ray Tracing (RTRT) which creates more realistic lighting effects than its predecessors.

GPU Engine Specs

Base Clock (MHz) 1350 MHz
Boost Clock (MHz) 1545 MHz

Memory Specs:

Memory Clock 14 Gbps
Standard Memory Config 11 GB
Memory Interface GDDR6
Memory Interface Width 384-bit
NVIDIA CUDA Cores 4352

RTX 3080 Ti

With great power comes a great price tag and the RTX 3080 Ti is no exception. The 3080 Ti shows an increase in speed as well as many areas and if you’re looking to turn on ray tracing while playing with some heavy specs, the 2080 Ti is no match for the 3080 Ti. The 3080 Ti is also comparable to the RTX 3090 – the main differences being the VRAM is only half of the 3090 and a smaller shader count.

GPU Engine Specs

Base Clock (MHz) 1365 MHz
Boost Clock (MHz) 1665 MHz

Memory Specs:

Memory Clock 19 Gbps
Standard Memory Config 12 GB
Memory Interface GDDR6X
Memory Interface Width 384-bit
NVIDIA CUDA Cores 10240

If you’re more of a visual learner, you can click here to see a video comparison of all the XX80 Ti graphics cards. Let us know which XX80 Ti graphics card was your favorite on Facebook!

Top 3 Most Graphically Demanding Games

By Gaming

Metro Exodus

Metro Exodus is a story-driven first person shooter. Driven by it’s post-apocalyptic setting, it combines combat and stealth with exploration and survival horror to create an intense and immersive gameplay.

With that being said – Metro Exodus comes out on top of this list due to the fact that even with the most powerful graphics card, your PC will still struggle to get up to 40 FPS while playing this game on the highest settings. This game is even more demanding when you take into account that it uses real-time ray tracing to achieve it’s realistic atmosphere. As you can see from the recommended specs below, you’ll need a pretty powerful PC.

OS Windows 10
Processor Intel Core i7-4770k
Memory 8 GB
Graphics Nvidia GTX 1070 / RTX 2060 / AMD RX VEGA 56
Storage 96 GB

Cyberpunk 2077

Cyberpunk 2077 is an action role-playing game set in Night City, a world set in the Cyberpunk universe that’s obsessed with body modifications. Played in the first person perspective, you play as a mercenary who sets out to go after the key to mortality – a one-of-a-kind implant.

One of the most anticipated games of the decade, Cyberpunk 2077 requires a pretty powerful PC, as it will go through your memory like no other. Even with the recommended requirements, Cyberpunk 2077 will still struggle to maintain its frame rates at points, especially if you’re using its real time ray-tracing features. This game uses so much power that even the most powerful PCs will still struggle to keep up with it. Below you can see the recommended specs for the game.

OS Windows 10
Processor Intel Core i7-4790k
Memory 16 GB
Graphics Nvidia GTX 1060 / AMD Radeon R9 Fury
Storage 70 GB

Microsoft Flight Simulator 2020

Microsoft Flight Simulator 202 is just as its name suggests – it’s a flight simulator that allows you to test your piloting skills with real world flight challenges and fly to anywhere on earth.

While the recommended specs don’t require the most beefy processor or graphics card to play, Microsoft Flight Simulator 2020 takes up a whopping 150 GB of storage. The game uses real-world graphics and gets data from satellites which gets processed into the game to recreate the entire planet – becoming one of the most accurate simulation games out right now. But be prepared – you’re going to be waiting quite a few hours for this game to download.

OS Windows 10
Processesor Intel Core i5-8400k
Memory 16 GB
Graphics Nvidia GTX 970 / AMD Radeon RX 590
Storage 150 GB

 

 

Select the fields to be shown. Others will be hidden. Drag and drop to rearrange the order.
  • Image
  • Price
  • Add to cart
  • Condition
  • Chipset Manufacturer
  • Ai-Upscaler
  • Memory Bus + Vram
  • Core Clock Speed
  • Boost Clock Speed
  • Cuda Cores
  • 150w 8-pin Power Connector
  • 525W 16-pin Power Connector
  • 75w 6-pin Power Connector
  • Slot Width
  • Dimensions (L x H, in)
  • CPU Socket Type
  • Performance Cores
  • Efficiency Cores
  • # of Threads
  • CPU Core Clock
  • CPU Boost Clock
  • L3 Cache
  • Ram Capacity
  • Ram Speed
  • First Word Latency
  • Form Factor
  • Ram Speed Limit
  • PSU Wattage
  • PSU Type
  • Efficiency Rating
  • Interface
  • Storage
  • Wireless/Wired
  • Maximum DPI
  • Backlit
Compare Products
Compare ×
Let's Compare! Continue shopping